THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE, SO FAR AS IT RELATES TO THE PROFESSION OF THE APOTHECARY, FROM THE EARLIEST ACCOUNTS TO THE PRESENT PERIOD: THE EVILS TO WHICH THE PROFESSION AND THE PUBLIC HAVE BEEN OF LATE YEARS EQUALLY EXPOSED; AND THE MEANS WHICH HAVE BEEN DEVISED TO REMEDY THEM.

(London: Printed for C. Dilly, in the Poultry, 1796). 195 x 115 mm. (7 5/8 x 4 1/2"). xxiv, viii [i.e. vi], 239, [1], 16 pp. Second Edition, "To which are prefixed, observations on a tract, entitled Murepsologia; and published in Answer to the former edition."

Recent retrospective half calf over marbled boards, raised bands, gilt titling, edges untrimmed. Front pastedown with bookplate of Society of Apothecaries. Blake, p. 180; Wellcome III, 135; Garrison-Morton 10016 (citing first edition). Occasional faint browning to edges of margins, a little dust-soiling to untrimmed edges, a couple of pages with minor smudges from printing process, one page with small wax stain in margin, otherwise an excellent copy, clean and fresh with ample, untrimmed margins, in an unworn binding.

First published the previous year, this first British history of pharmacology is credited by Britannica for doing "much to effect a greatly needed reform in the profession of the apothecary." A physician and Fellow of the Royal Society, Good (1764-1827) was a founding member of the General Pharmaceutic Association and was commissioned by that organization to produce this history, in an effort to defend the business and reputation of apothecaries from the encroachments of druggists and quacks. At that time, apothecaries functioned rather like general practitioners, providing medical care for those who could not afford the fees of a physician. Druggists were supposed to be responsible for mixing up medicines prescribed and distributed to patients by apothecaries or physicians, but had begun to sell their cures directly to patients, sometimes with disastrous results. While some druggists were qualified professionals, others were dangerous quacks. The General Pharmaceutic Association was formed to protect both the public and the profession of apothecary. DNB notes, "Although itself short-lived and ineffective, the association had an important place in the campaign for the Apothecaries Act in 1815." Good sought to establish the importance of apothecaries by tracing the history of the profession in Great Britain, tracing its origins to the arrival of Italian and French apothecaries circa 1360, following the fall of Constantinople. He goes on to outline the evolution of medical licensing, beginning in the reign of Henry VIII, and to explain the difference between apothecaries and druggists, and to emphasize the necessity of apothecaries in protecting the vulnerable public from unscrupulous quacks. In addition to a successful career as a doctor and an author of medical texts, Good was an accomplished linguist and translator who produced versions of the Song of Songs, the Book of Job, and Lucretius' "On the Nature of Things."
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THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE, SO FAR AS IT RELATES TO THE PROFESSION OF THE APOTHECARY, FROM THE EARLIEST ACCOUNTS TO THE PRESENT PERIOD: THE EVILS TO WHICH THE PROFESSION AND THE PUBLIC HAVE BEEN OF LATE YEARS EQUALLY EXPOSED; AND THE MEANS WHICH HAVE BEEN DEVISED TO REMEDY THEM. PHARMACOLOGY, JOHN MASON GOOD.
THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE, SO FAR AS IT RELATES TO THE PROFESSION OF THE APOTHECARY, FROM THE EARLIEST ACCOUNTS TO THE PRESENT PERIOD: THE EVILS TO WHICH THE PROFESSION AND THE PUBLIC HAVE BEEN OF LATE YEARS EQUALLY EXPOSED; AND THE MEANS WHICH HAVE BEEN DEVISED TO REMEDY THEM.
THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE, SO FAR AS IT RELATES TO THE PROFESSION OF THE APOTHECARY, FROM THE EARLIEST ACCOUNTS TO THE PRESENT PERIOD: THE EVILS TO WHICH THE PROFESSION AND THE PUBLIC HAVE BEEN OF LATE YEARS EQUALLY EXPOSED; AND THE MEANS WHICH HAVE BEEN DEVISED TO REMEDY THEM.

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