(Lhi21165) THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER. 17TH CENTURY ENGLISH BIBLE ILLUSTRATIONS, JOHN OGILBY, BIBLE IN ENGLISH, KING JAMES VERSION.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.
THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.

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Heavy Reading: Two Weighty (and Well-Preserved) Tomes With Dramatic, Diverting, and Skillfully Executed Biblical Engravings

THE HOLY BIBLE. [and] THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.

(Cambridge: Printed by John Field, 1660 [New Testament dated 1659]). 435 x 290 mm. (17 x 11 1/4"). The Apocrypha and New Testament bound following the Book of Common Prayer in volume II. Two volumes.

VERY STRIKING RECENT PERIOD-STYLE RED MOROCCO, EXTRAVAGANTLY GILT, covers with gilt-rule frames with gilt floral tooling along sides, gilt floral spray at corners, raised bands, spine compartments with central floral lozenge surrounded by gilt-tooled triangular and semi-circular compartments, gilt lettering, marbled endpapers, all edges gilt. Woodcut headpieces, tailpieces, and decorative initials, title pages with decorative border and small printer's device, engraved frontispiece of the King's Arms, ELABORATELY ENGRAVED TITLE PAGE OF SOLOMON ENTHRONED, A FOUR-PAGE FOLDING PLATE OF JERUSALEM, AND 109 DOUBLE-PAGE PLATES (including a four-panel map of the Holy Land as well as three double-page plates of Solomon's Temple, these four illustrations said to be additions in an "extra-illustrated" copy sold in 1998 at California Book Auction Galleries). Leaves ruled in red, with text in double columns. Beginning of each volume with a list of engravings written in a quite neat contemporary hand. Front pastedown with unidentified armorial bookplate. Front free endpaper with armorial bookplate of Joseph Livesey, perhaps the philanthropist and temperance advocate from Preston (1794-1884) who published the first teetotal publication in England. Darlow & Moule 525; Wing B-2258; ESTC R17044 and R31275. First four leaves of volume I with repairs at bottom corner (title page with a few square inches added, either from another copy or in remarkably dexterous manuscript, dedication page with loss of printer's last name), one folding plate with tip of lower right corner repaired (no loss), title page of Common Prayer a little soiled, otherwise remarkably fine with only trivial imperfections (minor stains, tiny rust spots, or faint foxing here and there). Apart from the repairs at the beginning, a very fine copy internally, and in unworn, sympathetic bindings that make a powerful impression.

This very large, magnificently illustrated Bible is the creation of John Ogilby (1600-76), the Scottish miscellaneous writer whose name is attached to so many collectible illustrated folio editions of classical and geographical works. As DNB indicates, Ogilby, "with the assistance of Dr. John Worthington and other divines . . . brought out at Cambridge in 1660 a noble edition of the Bible (two vols. royal folio), illustrated with 'chorographical sculps' by Ogilby himself, and 107 engravings by Dutch Golden Age engraver Cornelis Visscher (1629-58), after Rubens, de Vos, de Bruyn, Tintoretto and others. Having presented a splendidly bound copy of it to the king on his first coming to the royal chapel at Whitehall, he was commanded to supply other copies for use in the chapel, closet, library, and council chamber, at a cost of £200. He presented another copy to the House of Commons, for which he received £50." Presumably flushed with such acceptance and monetary success, "he petitioned the king to prohibit anyone for 10 years from printing a folio Bible such as his, and to commend his edition to all churches and chapels, that he might thereby be encouraged in his design of printing a polyglot Bible." He was apparently persuasive, because, according to Wing, the next folio Bible to be printed in England did not appear until 1674. This Bible would not have enjoyed wide use, however, because its size would very likely have confined its serviceability primarily to the church or chapel lectern. Pepys comments in his diary on 27 May 1667 that he was approached by a bookbinder with quires of Ogilby's Bible, and although Pepys seems resigned to buying the set, he comments that "it is like to be so big that I shall not use it." (Our books weigh more than 30 pounds.) But it is the very size of the volumes that contributes to the impressiveness of the engravings, a number of which are very dramatic, full of diverting detail, and skillfully executed. These are the kinds of illustrations that invite frequent and avid use of a book, so we are lucky that for some reason the present extremely well-preserved set was not much looked at.
(Lhi21165)

Price: $22,500.00