PAPER SHOULD NOT ALWAYS BE WHITE: A PRACTICAL EXAMINATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TYPE & PAPER.

(Vancouver, BC: Heavenly Monkey, 2013). 184 x 130 mm. (7 1/4 x 5 1/8"). [32] leaves. No. 2 OF FOUR ARTIST'S PROOFS and one of 14 copies with an additional seven paper samples.

APPEALING TAN CRUSHED MOROCCO, INLAID, ONLAID, AND TOOLED IN GILT AND BLIND, BY CLAUDIA COHEN, covers framed with gilt roll and dotted rules, inlaid triangles of ecru and taupe morocco on either side of centerpiece tooled in gilt and blind with small tools, in the manner of the typographical ornaments in the text, smooth spine with onlaid taupe morocco label, gilt titling, marbled endpapers, edges untrimmed. In the original linen clamshell box, brown leather label on spine. With abstract designs of typographical ornaments on the pages facing the text. Printed on 22 different paper samples. As new.

This is an attractive collaboration between a contemporary private press and a bookbinder of considerable reputation. Described by the publisher as "an experiment to see how changing nothing but the paper affects the appearance of text/type," this book displays an excerpt from an essay by American printer and typographer Daniel Updike (1860-1941) printed in Caslon type on 22 different specimens of paper, including a sheet from an incomplete copy of Blaeu's 1665 "Atlas Major." Updike declares, "Though ink must always be black, paper should not always be white." The papers here vary from shades of white and ecru to blues, green, pale yellow, and even a delicate Japanese Kaichu Shi, a type of tissue carried by women in their kimonos. Our Artist's Proof is one of 14 deluxe copies that contain seven more papers than the 15 used in the 20-copy regular issue, including the sheet from the Blaeu. Claudia Cohen is a contemporary binder who has been working with private presses and on her own projects for more than 30 years. She began her career at the Gehenna Press, first working with master printer Harold McGrath, then later in an apprenticeship with binder Gray Parrot. She set up her own bindery in Massachusetts in 1983, and moved the business to Seattle in 2003. She often does work for Rollin Milroy's Heavenly Monkey imprint, which is, according to their website, "dedicated to creating books for people interested in contemporary applications of traditional book crafts: handmade papers, letterpress printing, and bindings that emphasize both aesthetic and structural integrity."
(ST17263-29)