Cautioning against Eating Too Much Frog Meat

A TREATISE OF ALL SORTS OF FOODS, BOTH ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE: ALSO OF DRINKABLES.

(London: Printed for T. Osborne, 1745). 171 x 108 mm. (6 3/4 x 4 1/4"). xii, 372 pp., [12] leaves.Translated from the French by D[aniel] Hay, M.D. Fourth Printing in English.

Contemporary sprinkled calf, covers with double gilt border, raised bands flanked by double gilt rules (expertly rebacked, retaining backstrip and original label). Woodcut headpieces and tailpieces. Approbation leaf with perforated stamp and inked accession number of the Spokane Public Library (the book consigned to Christie's East and sold at its 12 October 2000 auction). Vicaire, p. 514; Maclean, p. 89; Oxford, p. 49; Cagle 822; Bitting, pp. 281-82; Gabler, p. 165. Corners and edges a bit rubbed, covers with small stains and a few marks, but the carefully restored binding solid, generally well preserved, and certainly pleasing. Title page with overall browning (apparently from protracted exposure to light while on display), a little browning and foxing in second half of volume, but still an excellent copy internally, the text almost entirely fresh and very clean, and with few signs of use.

This is apparently the fourth appearance (but issued before the "second edition") of the first English translation of the "Traité des Alimens" by the chemist and physician Louis Lemery (1677-1743), physician to the king of France, member of the Royal Academy, and son of the famous pharmacist and chemist Nicholas Lemery. Originally published in Paris in 1702 and first printed in English two years later, the work is divided into three sections, the first on the effects on one's constitution of various fruits, vegetables, and spices; the second on flesh, fowl, and fish; and the final section on drink. Lemery believes that what one eats is a key to health and that moderation and a balanced diet are advised (although he qualifies this by noting that our earliest ancestors were vegetarians and healthier for being so). Perhaps addressing a contemporaneous culinary preference of which we are unaware, he cautions against overindulgence in frog meat, and he comes out in favor of water and tea as beverages. Wine is also healthful when taken in moderation, and the same is true of coffee and chocolate, although he warns that excesses will cause sleeplessness. After the first edition in English of 1704, Maclean lists "another edition" in the same year issued by the same publisher, then a 1706 printing, then our edition, which adds to Lemery's text "an introduction treating of foods in general." Little is known about the Dr. Daniel Hay except that he translated this book; the Wellcome catalogue guesses that he was born in 1669 (see Volume III, 226).
(ST8419)

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A TREATISE OF ALL SORTS OF FOODS, BOTH ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE: ALSO OF DRINKABLES. LEMERY, OUIS.
A TREATISE OF ALL SORTS OF FOODS, BOTH ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE: ALSO OF DRINKABLES.

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